Diseases we treat…


Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune systemic inflammatory disease which affects up to 0.8% of the population which translates into 2.4 million Americans. It’s cause is due to genetic susceptibility and environmental factors which research is beginning to identify. It causes joint pain, stiffness, patterned symmetrical joint swelling of the fingers and wrists (being most common), deformities, X-ray damage, decreased function, poor quality of life and disability. RA contributes to other disease states such as heart attacks and strokes. The diagnosis is made on the symptoms, examination, blood tests known as rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP antibody, X-rays, ultrasound, and MRI.​


PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

Psoriatic arthritis comes in many forms and varieties. It can look just like rheumatoid arthritis (RA), involve the spine in a way similar to ankylosing spondylitis (inflammation of the spine), and can be associated with non-musculoskeletal issues such as sores in the mouth and inflammation in the eye. Of course, it is also possible to have Rheumatoid Arthritis in combination with, but unrelated to psoriasis. Psoriatic skin/nail changes, may predate the joint symptoms, or even follow the joint symptoms by years. X-rays and labs can assist in the diagnosis, but can be as confusing to the “uninitiated/inexperienced” observer as they can be helpful.

SLE

There are many manifestations of systemic lupus, from mild to life threatening. The most common symptoms include: rash (with a “butterfly rash” occurring on the face being common); sun sensitivity; arthritis; mouth and other mucous membranes sores; pericarditis (inflammation around the lining of the heart); pleurisy (inflammation around the lining of the lungs); a tendency to form blood clots; a tendency for blood vessels to get inflamed; seizures; renal disease which can lead to kidney failure and dialysis; blood abnormalities, etc.​

ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that causes pain and inflammation of the joints of the spine and the joints between the spine and pelvis (sacroiliac joints). However, AS may also involve other parts of the body as well. AS and its related diseases affect as many as 2.4 million people in the United States. AS commonly occurs in people between the ages of 17-35, but it can affect children and older adults. AS is more common in men, but occurs in women as well. Although the exact cause of AS is unknown, we do know that genetics, along with some environmental factors, play a key role in AS.

SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

There are many manifestations of systemic lupus, from mild to life threatening. The most common symptoms include: rash (with a “butterfly rash” occurring on the face being common); sun sensitivity; arthritis; mouth and other mucous membranes sores; pericarditis (inflammation around the lining of the heart); pleurisy (inflammation around the lining of the lungs); a tendency to form blood clots; a tendency for blood vessels to get inflamed; seizures; renal disease which can lead to kidney failure and dialysis; blood abnormalities, etc.

Crohn's Disease

Crohn’s disease (CD) is an inflammatory Bowel disease that causes inflammation in your digestive tract which then leads to severe abdominal pain, diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss and in some cases, malnutrition. The disease can affect persons of any age, and its onset is most common in the second and third decades. Females are affected slightly more than males, and the risk for disease is higher in some ethnic groups. CD has been characterized by significant morbidity including abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss/malnutrition, a progressive nature that leads to complications such as fistulas, strictures, and abscesses.

SPONDYLOARTHRITIS

 

Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a group of inflammatory diseases which share a number of features including inflammation of the axial skeleton and occasionally peripheral joints, enthesial (tendon, ligament and joint capsule) insertion sites throughout the body. AS, a male-predominant disease, presents in individuals in their 20 and 30s as back pain with characteristic inflammatory features such as worsening with rest, improvement with activity, and stiffness. 


Gout

Physicians diagnose gout when they see someone who has the classic presentation of intermittent flares of their joints in the setting of high blood uric acid. Although the blood uric acid is not always elevated during an acute flare it is almost always elevated between flares. A definitive diagnosis can be made when fluid is aspirated from the joint and it shows the colorful needle-shaped crystals of uric acid. Although gout can be an extremely painful disease it also is one of the most treatable diseases. With careful attention to diet and strict compliance to medications most patients can lead normal active lives.